Girls’ And Boys’ Technological Toys: Music Composition In The Computerized Classroom

Main Article Content

Victoria Armstrong

Abstract

This article explores 15 to 18-year old boys’ and girls’ compositional processes as mediated by music technology. Adopting Sherry Turkle’s theory of ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ styles of mastery, I assert that a compositional approach that emphasizes technological control and manipulation may be more conducive to the working styles of boys than girls. In drawing this conclusion, I focus on three female composers, examining to what extent they were able to transcend or reconfigure the hard mastery expectations that had been imposed upon them.

Article Details

How to Cite
ARMSTRONG, Victoria. Girls’ And Boys’ Technological Toys: Music Composition In The Computerized Classroom. GEMS (Gender, Education, Music, and Society), the on-line journal of GRIME (Gender Research in Music Education), [S.l.], v. 7, n. 5, may 2014. ISSN 1710-6923. Available at: <https://ojs.library.queensu.ca/index.php/gems/article/view/5234>. Date accessed: 23 nov. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.5561/gems.v7i5.5234.
Section
Pedagogical Spotlights