“To remain working for the People” : Ojibwe Women in an Indigenous Teacher Education Program

Main Article Content

Kate Freeman

Abstract

This paper explores the role of relationships for eight Indigenous (Ojibwe) women enrolled in a Canadian teacher education program, specifically, the ways in which relationships pertained to Indigenous culture-creation and continuity through education. Findings from this small study suggest that there is some consistency in the relational orientations and in the roles of Ojibwe women past and present. The paper outlines ways in which study participants are demonstrating cultural continuity in fulfilling roles as learners and as teachers of Indigenous students. It concludes with questions and implications for the design and practice of Indigenous education.

Article Details

How to Cite
FREEMAN, Kate. “To remain working for the People” : Ojibwe Women in an Indigenous Teacher Education Program. Encounters in Theory and History of Education, [S.l.], v. 9, p. 121-143, oct. 2008. ISSN 2560-8371. Available at: <https://ojs.library.queensu.ca/index.php/encounters/article/view/1775>. Date accessed: 26 june 2017.
Keywords
Ojibwe women teachers; Indigenous teacher education; cultural continuity; Indigenous mentors; Canadian Aboriginal teacher education; Ojibwe relational orientations
Section
Part II: Aboriginal education: North American and Latin American issues