DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTERDISCIPLINARY GRADUATE PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING PRACTICE

Megan Dodd, Julie Conder, David K. Potter, Richard Allen, Salman Bawa, Robert Fleisig

Abstract


In Innovation Studio, students learn how to
make meaningful, creative contributions to their
communities as emerging practicing professionals working
on complex, multi-stakeholder problems involving
elements of technology, design, business, and public
policy.
Innovation Studio builds on McMaster University’s
longstanding commitment to relevance through community
engagement. In the Walter G. Booth School of Engineering
Practice (W Booth School) in the Faculty of Engineering,
we encourage our students to see not just the technical side
of the international problems such as energy
independence, food security and clean water, but as an
opportunity to co-create change with our global and local
communities for the good of all human beings, society, and
nature.
Students immerse themselves in the communities in
which challenges have been identified. Innovation Studio
is the place and time where students bring those
experiences back to the School, share their learnings and
explore new ideas in a safe and familiar environment.
W Booth students develop a deeper understanding of the
need for empathy as they move toward a new direction or
idea. Working within the context of problem identification,
the teams learn how to define a project and plan an
approach to produce meaningful work, prototypes, policy
analysis and new enterprises.
This paper reports on the design and development of
Innovation Studio as well as feedback collected from
students through focus groups.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24908/pceea.v0i0.6472